Posts for: June, 2012

By Steven D. Dunning DDS
June 23, 2012
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
OralHealthTipsforSpecialNeedsChildren

If you are the parent or caregiver of a special needs child or a child with a chronic disease, you face additional challenges when it comes to life's everyday routines. This includes establishing and maintaining good oral health so that your child is not at risk for other healthcare issues due to poor oral hygiene. For these reasons, our office has put together real-world advice that will make a difference in the life of your child.

The visit to our office that can make the biggest difference is your child's first one. However, be sure to contact us in advance of your child's appointment to let us know the details of your child's special needs or chronic disease state. This will give us the opportunity to contact your child's primary care physician or one of his/her specialists before starting treatment to obtain any medical information or special instructions. It will also enable us to be prepared so that we can pay special attention to these needs, as well as to make any necessary modifications to our office and/or equipment. Our primary focus is to work with you and your child's healthcare team towards the same goal. We all want your office visit to go smoothly and comfortably so that your child's first dental experience is a positive one.

Depending on the age of your child and his/her special needs, we most likely will start a gentle process of training and education. For example we will teach your child how to brush properly. It is important that you sit in and participate in this educational process so that you can reinforce this training at home. And little things count; before working with your child at home, you should set the stage so that it will be a comfortable setting with adequate light, fresh water for rinsing, and a mirror. You also need to have all of your supplies handy, such as a toothbrush, toothpaste, floss and rubber gloves (if needed).

To learn more tips, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How To Care for the Oral Health of Children with Disabilities and Special Needs.” Or, you can contact us today to schedule an appointment or to discuss your questions about your child's special oral healthcare needs.


By Steven D. Dunning DDS
June 15, 2012
Category: Oral Health
TheTruthAboutThumbSucking

In times of stress, people have many ways to comfort themselves. For adults, it can be habits such as eating, drinking, or smoking. For children, it is often sucking their thumb, fingers, or a pacifier. Babies have been observed in scans to suck on their fingers and thumbs even before they are born. It makes them feel secure.

When is thumb sucking a problem?
Sucking on fingers or thumbs can be a problem when it is done too vigorously and too long. A young child's jaws are soft and can change their shape to make room for the thumb if the child sucks too hard and too often. If thumb, finger or pacifier habits continue too long, the upper front teeth may tip toward the lip or not come into the correct position in the mouth.

How do you know if your child falls into the group that will suffer from the results of too much thumb sucking? It's best to visit our office so we can check on how the child's teeth and jaws are developing.

What can be done about thumb and finger sucking?
Most children naturally stop sucking their thumbs, fingers, or pacifiers between the age of two and four. The pacifier habit is easier to break than the thumb or finger sucking habit, probably because it is always easier to find their fingers or thumbs. It is a good idea to try to transfer your child's habit to a pacifier at an early age. The next steps are to cut down pacifier usage and gradually stop by 18 months.

If your child is still engaging in these habits at age three, we can recommend strategies for cutting back and stopping. Remember that positive reinforcement, in which a child is rewarded for the desired behavior, always works better than punishment for the behavior you don't like.

Also remember that finger and thumb sucking is normal. Help your child to feel safe, secure, and comfortable as the behavior will probably disappear by itself. If you are worried about your child's sucking a pacifier, thumb or fingers, please visit us to put your mind at rest.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about children's thumb sucking. For more information, read “Thumb Sucking in Children” in Dear Doctor magazine.


By Steven D. Dunning DDS
June 07, 2012
Category: Oral Health
FrequentlyAskedQuestionsAboutHeartandGumDiseases

Recent research has revealed that there is a link between cardiovascular (“cardio” – heart; “vascular” – blood vessel) disease (CVD) and periodontal (gum) disease. The link is Inflammation. This is why it is important to learn more about this important relationship so that you can take proactive steps to improving your health and life.

What causes periodontal disease?
Simply put, irregular and ineffective brushing and flossing are the root causes of periodontal disease. Over time and when bacterial biofilms (dental plaque) are left unchecked, they lead to the emergence of a small set of highly pathogenic (“patho” – disease; “genic” – causing) organisms that are consistently associated with periodontitis (“peri” – gum; “odont” – tooth; “itis” – inflammation) or gum disease.

Is periodontal disease common or am I one of the few who have it?
It is a quite common disease, with mild to moderate forms of it impacting 30 to 50% of US adults. More severe cases affect 5 to 15%. One of the reasons these numbers are so high is because periodontal disease is a silent, painless disease that often occurs without any symptoms.

So how does my gum disease link to potential heart disease?
Inflammation is a characteristic of chronic disease. People with moderate to severe periodontitis have increased levels of systemic (general body) inflammation. If left untreated, the same bacterial strains that are commonly found in periodontal pockets surrounding diseased teeth have been found in blood vessel plaques of people with CVD.

This all sounds bad...is there any good news?
Yes! Research has revealed that if periodontal disease is treated, inflammation and infection can be reduced. This also reduces the risk for heart attacks and strokes, both of which are common results of CVD. All it may take is a thorough exam for gum disease and thorough dental cleaning. During your exam, we can also make sure you are brushing and flossing properly so that you are effectively removing bacterial biofilm. But if you have severe periodontal disease, you may need deeper cleanings and more advanced treatment to save your teeth and your heart.

To learn more on this subject, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Link Between Heart & Gum Diseases.” You can also contact us today with any questions or to schedule an appointment.




Belton
561 North Scott Ave. Suite A
Belton, MO 64012
(816) 331-4333
fax: (816) 318-8178

Adrian
20 E. Main St.
Adrian, MO 64720
(816) 297-2297




Archive:

Tags